Dating china patterns

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Using a foundation of social exchange theory, the analyses illustrate the differences between the dating attitudes and expectations of Chinese women and men.

Per traditional expectations, both sexes place a low priority on sexual behaviors, yet more progressive attitudes and behaviors are also evident.

Using the Spode archive and published books you can learn about different backstamps (marks) on Spode pieces.

This though can only be a guide to a date - it is not an exact science and some backstamps were used for many, many years.

During the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), the familiar underglazed blue-and-white patterns many people associate with fine "china" were developed, while detailed decorative painting over glaze also became a common technique.

Chinese porcelain was exported to Europe as early as the 1100s, but it was rare and only available to the very wealthy.

Women, in particular, appear to be more focused on pragmatic qualities in prospective partners.

The influence of individualist values and the changing cultural norms pertaining to dating and familial roles are discussed.

Beyond the basic desires which most individuals experience during this time, researchers have noted the relative significance of dating, not only for individuals but also for societies.

It was a requirement of this Act that all such imports carried the name of the country of manufacture.

This provided well-known marks such as "Bavaria," "England," "Nippon," - indicating the country of manufacture.

Because it has been in existence for more than 200 years, it is the china pattern with the longest continual production in history. It finds its roots in China, where throughout the 15th through 18th centuries, the Chinese potters were exporting their porcelain wares decorated with hand-painted cobalt designs under glaze.

In the 18th century, companies like the East India Company imported the blue and white Chinese porcelains into England.

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